Sea Stories

Low Bridges & High Water on the ICW

Low Bridges & High Water on the ICW

I wonder when they’re going to have to change the height restrictions on the ICW? Sea level rise is absolutely a real thing, and we didn’t see a single bridge that actually showed the full, advertised 65’ of vertical clearance since leaving Norfolk. Part of it was due to the Super Moon, but most of the locals we spoke to in Melbourne said it’s been high all year, and I read reports on Active Captain as old as 2011 that stated that the Wabasso Bridge was showing low clearances back then.

Paul Exner comments on the IMMENSE BVI rebuild after IRMA.

Paul Exner comments on the IMMENSE BVI rebuild after IRMA.

Well ... the clean-up is immense, a belief shared by many BVI-islanders. There are very few easy solutions to rectify the entanglement of owners, insurers, businesses, and other vested interests. Everyone is trying to do the right thing, but the negotiations are not clear-cut, and it's just about the most complex thing I've ever witnessed ... -Paul Exner, October 16, 2017.

Happy 10 Years of Sailing!

Happy 10 Years of Sailing!

Today is kind of a big day in my life as a ‘sailor’, although I am very far away from the sailing scene at the moment. Ten years ago, I spent some time in New Zealand with my best friend Johanna, driving our new to us backpacker car – a Nissan Bluebird – exploring the beauty of New Zealand, camping, hiking, meeting lots of fun people and truly having the time of our life.

To the Arctic!

To the Arctic!

Matt Rutherford's first post of their latest Ocean Research Project voyage to Greenland. Matt and Nicole departed Annapolis last week, and are en route. We'll be posting their blog entries here on 59º North for your adventure reading pleasure. Check out Matt's site at oceanresearchproject.org.

Guest post: Feeding the offshore racing or delivery crew

Guest post: Feeding the offshore racing or delivery crew

Imagine tossing a chicken carcass into a cage of hungry wolves, I think that’s a good idea of what feeding time looks like on a lot of offshore racers and delivery boats. As cook, on a sea going racer, you need not worry about comparisons to the finer restaurants in town. The ingredients for success are simple; two large deep pots, garlic and onions, a little planning, and variety, and watch your fingers at feeding time.

Chatting with Senator Harkin in Hope Town

Chatting with Senator Harkin in Hope Town

Yesterday, before the guys got here, my dad and I took the ferry over to Hope Town. It's known for the old 1800's lighthouse with red and white stripes, that still burns a kerosine light to this day. Retired Senator Tom Harkin of Iowa lives there when he's not in DC. Tom sailed with me on both legs of the Serenity passage from BVI-Tortola and back in February, and I've gotten to become pretty good friends with him.

What I learned crossing the Atlantic

What I learned crossing the Atlantic

Rudolphe Dutel recounts his first Atlantic crossing sailing the classic trade wind route with the ARC rally last November - complete with great photos and cool GIFs. After finishing the Paris Marathon in 2009, sailing redefined his take on 'long-term' projects. "You live around sailing," he writes, "instead of running around your routine. Both are extremely rewarding and quite humbling."

Landfall in Sweden (Redux)

Landfall in Sweden (Redux)

In lieu of my recent arrival to Sweden today (I flew overnight from Newark-Oslo-Stockholm, and am going on one hour of sleep and four cups of strong Swedish coffee), I wanted to re-post this blog from two years ago when Arcturus made her first arrival in Sweden. It was an emotional moment for Mia and I (especially Mia), and it seems simultaneously like yesterday and ages ago.

Arcturus has spent all of last winter hauled out in Öregrund - we'll launch her next week, and get back to living aboard for the remainder of the summer here in Scandinavia. No plans yet on where we're headed, but stay tuned. I'll be writing about it. In the meantime, enjoy this revisited post...